Environmental Impact of Sweatshops

Though sweatshops are at large a human rights issue they are also an environmental concern. Making clothing uses many harsh chemicals and uneviromntal practices. When these processes are done in sweatshops the hazardous waste is often simply poured into the surrounding habitat, polluting water and land. The fashion industry is in fact the second largest clean water polluter in the world falling only behind agriculture. In addition the industry is the second biggest polluter in the world and produces 25% of the worlds chemical waste. These numbers are a result of products such as rotten flesh, blood and skin, dissolved lime, sulphuric acid, bleach, dyes, heavy metals and fat being poured directly into rivers and waste piles from sweatshops. Tanneries such as the Hazaribagh tannery produce up to and more than 12,000 cubic meters untreated of waste daily. Water pollution is not the only type of pollution that sweatshops produce, air pollution, acid rain  are also results of the of lack followed regulations. All of this causes ecosystem to become overtaxed and become unsafe, destroying the world we must live in. This all goes to say that sweatshops are a bigger problem than you or me buying a shirt made by slave labour. It is an environment hazard that is contending to degradation of our world.

 

 

References

Biswas, Banani. Hamada, Takeshi (2012). Relation between Hazaribagh Tannery Industry Development and Buriganga River Pollution in Bangladesh International Journal of Environment, 2(2): 2186-0009, 117–127

 

Lendman, Stephen. (February 25th, 2010). Global Sweatshop Wage Slavery. from http://dissidentvoice.org/2010/02/global-sweatshop-wage-slavery/

 

Ditty, Sarah. (2015). Europe in the World: The garment textiles & fashion industry. from, https://europa.eu/eyd2015/en/fashion-revolution/posts/europe-world-garment-textiles-and-fashion-industry

 

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